Scoring Games

Type of Game: Scoring Game
All the games in this section are called scoring games because scoring is done during play and at the end of each hand.
In these several games, a player is awarded points every time he makes a play that results in the open ends of the tiles in the line of play adding up to a multiple of 5: Muggins, All Fives, Five-Up, Sniff, Seven-Toed Pete, and Merry-Go-Round.
In the game of All Threes, points are awarded to a player when he makes a play that results in the open ends of the tiles in the line of play adding up to a multiple of 3; and, in the game of Threes and Fives, points are awarded for multiples of 3 and multiples of 5.
In the game of Bergen, points are scored by a player after he makes a play resulting in both open ends of the tiles in the line of play being alike.
All the games in this section, with the exception of Bergen, are very similar. And, just like most of the domino games in this book, sometimes the identical game rules go by two or more different names depending on what country or what part of a country you are in. Sometimes games that go by the same name aren't played with the same rules. Then there are also many, many different variations of certain games that go by a slightly different, but very similar, name.
Here are some examples of what I found in my research.
Five different domino game instruction books state that what makes the game of All Fives unique from all other games in the "five-point family" of games is that when hands are drawn at the beginning of the game, only five tiles per player are drawn regardless of the number of players. Yet, in another book written by a group of authors most consider to be experts, players of the game of All Fives are instructed to draw 7 tiles each if there are 2 playing and 5 tiles each if there are 3 or 4 players.
The very thing that is said to make the game of Five-Up unique from all other games in the "five-point family" of games is that every double played is a spinner. Yet I found rules to the game in one place that make no mention at all that every double played is a spinner.
I could give many more such examples for this book, I have attempted to list variations of rules. When I found rules that contradict each other, as in the examples above, I went with the most-often-noted rules.
Unless otherwise indicated, the games here use the following rules:
One set of double-6 dominoes (28 pieces) is used.
Shuffle the dominoes, facedown, at the beginning of each hand.
Object of the game: To gain the highest score possible by making points while playing the game and by being the first player to domino.

© 2016 The American Domino Company
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